Tag Archives: Twitter

A Fundamental Shift – Are We Listening?

There’s a fundamental shift going on in the way we are getting our information, processing it, and acting on it.  Organizations – of all shapes/colors/flavors/sizes – would be wise to pay attention:

  • Facebook would be the fourth largest nation in the world
  • YouTube (where I found this video) is the second largest search engine in the world

People are talking:

  • 25% of search results for the world’s 20 largest brands link to user-generated content
  • millions of bloggers are talking about your products online

Think about it … do you buy a product – a bike, a car, a house – because of an ad, or because of the recommendation(s) of others.  The majority of our decisions as consumers are based on recommendations from those we trust.  And despite that, companies continue to yell and scream and try to get our attention.  Car dealers print bigger ads in newspapers that no one’s reading.  Politicians buy more air time for shows that no one’s watching.  Real estate agents try to be everything to everyone (“Call me for all your needs”) in an era where specialization and consultation are demanded.  I can promise you that you’re missing the point if you think all of this is about marketing in an online world.  There are Get-Rich CD’s for that.

YouTube - Social Media RevolutionA good explanation of social media, in plain english:

Is your company or organization evolving? Mine will be.

Updated 8/17/09 – Seems this video has caught the attention of a lot of people:

Socially Speaking with Rose Bowen and NRVNews.com

Social media has become an important part of the business plan of many local New River Valley local businesses in the last several months. This is the second in the series of posts highlighting those businesses, and showing all of us how they’re using the web to grow their business. I’d love to highlight you, as well – send an email to Jeremy at NRVLiving.com, or hit up @NRVLiving on Twitter.
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A Virtual Handshake

One of the interesting things about this Internet that Al Gore gave us is the myriad of ways that people are always finding new ways of engaging and interacting and, in some cases, doing business.  What works for you might not work for me, and vice versa.  But one thing we all have the opportunity to do is make friends, offline, with the people we “know” offline.

I’ve had that opportunity with the folks at Handshake 2.0, and I’m grateful.  Recently, they called – well emailed and Tweeted ’cause that’s how we roll – myself and Tommy Clapp, from advantage-properties.com, to ask how all this social media stuff was working in the real estate business … here’s the article.  Thanks to Z. Kelly Queijo for the article, and I’m looking forward to extending that handshake in real life!

News Ain’t Just Broken On TV Any More

A few weeks ago, I was contacted by WDBJ7's news anchor Natasha Ryan about a story she was writing on the online social media site called Twitter.

Now, I've admitted my addictions here on the blog before, and it was interesting to see a local news outlet not only recognizing the power of the service but taking the time to investigate it further.  Below is the final result, in two parts done on last night's broadcast:

Certainly I feel the service is an invaluable tool – it helps me connect with friends, it's enabled me the opportunity to meet current and future customers, and it's even influenced the creation of a new small business startup in the New River Valley.  It's nice to see local news outlets exploring new ways of breaking news and staying in touch with their viewers.  If you're on Twitter, make sure to check out these local news and civic organizations:

There are many more, I'm sure, but these were some I could recall off the top of my head.  Thanks to Natasha and WDBJ7 for the story, as well as to Patsy Stewart, Ira Kaufman and Stuart Mease for their participation as well, and to Kevin Cupp for recording the video!

Hey – are we connected?

My Public Admission – I’m An Addict

Have I told you about Twitter?  No?  Well, allow me to introduce myself … my name is Jeremy, and I’m a Twitteraholic.

Several months ago there was a buzz through the online real estate community about this new online communication tool.  "Have you heard about Twitter?"  "Are you on Twitter?"  I had no idea what Twitter was, but people kept saying things like "it’s microblogging", it’s "text messaging over the web".  When I looked it up, I saw no immediate use for it – post what you’re doing online for people to see, ask questions that people can answer … how is this any different than anything else out there?  A friend of mine – and new Twitter user – accurately described it as a group chat, and he’s partially right.  I quickly found out that Twitter was so much more.

When I created an account, I was quickly "followed" by a user here in Blacksburg with the username @TMarkiewicz (I’m sure there’s a reason why we have to have the @ symbol in our names, but I don’t know what it is).  @TMarkiewicz saw that I was in the same area as he was, and he followed me … so whenever I posted something to Twitter, he saw it and could respond.  As my community of people I followed – and those that followed me – grew, the conversations expanded – if @Tmarkiewicz wasn’t following the same people I was, he wouldn’t see the whole conversation, just a portion.  But it also introduced him to people in my social circles, and vice versa.  You can run applications on your computer, or your phone, that tell you when people you follow post something to Twitter, and you can choose various notification options as well.  It’s all very ADD-ish, and while I don’t pay attention to everything everyone posts, it fits my need to multi-task.

I still wasn’t seeing a business-value to Twitter though.  I was learning a lot about people around the country that I followed, though – in particular, I started to learn about them through the posts they made online.  I learned about their real estate markets, I learned about their marketing strategies, I learned about them as professionals … and suddenly I found that it was becoming a community.  I was becoming part of a community.  And it was affecting my business in a way that I hadn’t expected – I was CONSTANTLY learning something new, that I could apply to my business here, and it was making me a better professional.  All of that education, for free!  The best kind …

Then one day, it happened.  I got a message from @TMarkiewicz that said he and his wife were going to be leaving the area, and they wanted to talk with me about possibly listing their home.  WOW … here was this guy I’d never met who was inviting me into his home to discuss being his representative, and solely because of the relationship I’d formed with him on Twitter.  I was floored.  We talked, we negotiated, and a few weeks later we listed his home.  Suddenly, it happened again.  Another message, this time from @stuboo (don’t you just love some of these names?).  This message was a little different, it said "@NRVLiving, have you ever gotten a client from Twitter?".  When I responded yes, he wrote back "would you like another one?"

Amazing.  Two clients, a buyer and a seller, both acquired through relationships formed on Twitter.  I haven’t even had the chance to meet @stuboo yet, but I know a lot about him, and he about me, and we’re working on crafting a search that’ll help him land a home here to serve his needs for the next few years.  Awesome.

So now I’m a Twitterholic.  I don’t expect that everyone will receive business-related contacts from the service, but they certainly might.  The greater value may just be in connecting us with other individuals who share similar interests, or similar geographic locations, or maybe we just like talking with each other.  We may never meet in person, but I notice when they’re not online anymore.  And when I close these pieces of business, I might just send Twitter a thank you card.  Who should I address that to?

A post on customer service is forthcoming, but here’s an example of  how companies are using Twitter to actually SERVE their customers better.  If you join Twitter, look me up

If you enjoyed this post, you can subscribe via RSS or email here to be sure you don’t miss the next post about customer service.

My Public Admission – I’m An Addict

Have I told you about Twitter?  No?  Well, allow me to introduce myself … my name is Jeremy, and I’m a Twitteraholic.

Several months ago there was a buzz through the online real estate community about this new online communication tool.  "Have you heard about Twitter?"  "Are you on Twitter?"  I had no idea what Twitter was, but people kept saying things like "it’s microblogging", it’s "text messaging over the web".  When I looked it up, I saw no immediate use for it – post what you’re doing online for people to see, ask questions that people can answer … how is this any different than anything else out there?  A friend of mine – and new Twitter user – accurately described it as a group chat, and he’s partially right.  I quickly found out that Twitter was so much more.

When I created an account, I was quickly "followed" by a user here in Blacksburg with the username @TMarkiewicz (I’m sure there’s a reason why we have to have the @ symbol in our names, but I don’t know what it is).  @TMarkiewicz saw that I was in the same area as he was, and he followed me … so whenever I posted something to Twitter, he saw it and could respond.  As my community of people I followed – and those that followed me – grew, the conversations expanded – if @Tmarkiewicz wasn’t following the same people I was, he wouldn’t see the whole conversation, just a portion.  But it also introduced him to people in my social circles, and vice versa.  You can run applications on your computer, or your phone, that tell you when people you follow post something to Twitter, and you can choose various notification options as well.  It’s all very ADD-ish, and while I don’t pay attention to everything everyone posts, it fits my need to multi-task.

I still wasn’t seeing a business-value to Twitter though.  I was learning a lot about people around the country that I followed, though – in particular, I started to learn about them through the posts they made online.  I learned about their real estate markets, I learned about their marketing strategies, I learned about them as professionals … and suddenly I found that it was becoming a community.  I was becoming part of a community.  And it was affecting my business in a way that I hadn’t expected – I was CONSTANTLY learning something new, that I could apply to my business here, and it was making me a better professional.  All of that education, for free!  The best kind …

Then one day, it happened.  I got a message from @TMarkiewicz that said he and his wife were going to be leaving the area, and they wanted to talk with me about possibly listing their home.  WOW … here was this guy I’d never met who was inviting me into his home to discuss being his representative, and solely because of the relationship I’d formed with him on Twitter.  I was floored.  We talked, we negotiated, and a few weeks later we listed his home.  Suddenly, it happened again.  Another message, this time from @stuboo (don’t you just love some of these names?).  This message was a little different, it said "@NRVLiving, have you ever gotten a client from Twitter?".  When I responded yes, he wrote back "would you like another one?"

Amazing.  Two clients, a buyer and a seller, both acquired through relationships formed on Twitter.  I haven’t even had the chance to meet @stuboo yet, but I know a lot about him, and he about me, and we’re working on crafting a search that’ll help him land a home here to serve his needs for the next few years.  Awesome.

So now I’m a Twitterholic.  I don’t expect that everyone will receive business-related contacts from the service, but they certainly might.  The greater value may just be in connecting us with other individuals who share similar interests, or similar geographic locations, or maybe we just like talking with each other.  We may never meet in person, but I notice when they’re not online anymore.  And when I close these pieces of business, I might just send Twitter a thank you card.  Who should I address that to?

A post on customer service is forthcoming, but here’s an example of  how companies are using Twitter to actually SERVE their customers better.  If you join Twitter, look me up

If you enjoyed this post, you can subscribe via RSS or email here to be sure you don’t miss the next post about customer service.